Tuesday, December 30, 2014

Quick Thoughts: Newsweek Article About The Bible

I respect the fact that people have differing opinions and beliefs. I also am fully aware that there are always two sides to every story. But even though I'm not an expert theologian or a professional reporter, I can say this Newsweek article is highly unfortunate. Good for business I suppose, but potentially an unwarranted problem for those of us that know the beauty of the Church and following Jesus.  If you have not read it I recommend you do so at some point. I cannot take the time to personally address or affirm all the points made here on this blog post, but I will share a few thoughts on this, albeit blunt thoughts. College students will likely hear about this, so here are a few bullet points to maybe keep in mind upfront:
  1. Clearly stated bias. Thankfully the author clearly states his bias in the beginning. He doesn't state it as a "bias" and anyone somewhat disgruntled with the Church or Christianity will resonate with his statements, which is a bummer. But, those with some intellectual honesty can easily realize this is being written from a bias perspective.
  2. Not-so-good reporting. With the tone of getting to the truth, this sadly does not "report" much but instead states a particular perspective as the facts. And the author doesnt state sources but rather makes swooping statements like "all modern scholars." This is misleading to say the least because the author only listed straw-man arguments..
  3. Fantastic, but unfortunate rhetoric. By making his statements as irrefutable facts that don't have rational explanations and doing so in ways that make anyone that claims to believe in the authority of scripture as being total idiots, readers that are not well informed on the scrutinies listed will likely think the bible is completely discredited.
  4. Dishearteningly one-sided. This article assumes there are not opposing thoughts or deeper understanding and does so by not even mentioning other thoughts or that there are common and often basic explanations for such things.

If you would like to read much more thorough thoughts on this article I would recommend Al Mohler's blog or Michael Kruger's blog.